Jack’s Wife.

Lamp 3rd series, 21 (July 1881): 6-8.

Reprinted in Idle Thoughts no. 23, Spring 2000, pp. 16-19.

 

Reminiscences of a Brief Stage Career.  A Chronicle of the London Stage.

By a Would-be Actor.

Play 2, no. 67 (25 January 1883): 114-15 to no. 83 (17 May 1883): 242-43

Published as On the Stage – and Off: the Brief Career of a Would-be Actor.

 London, Field & Tuer, 1885).

 

The Office Boy.

Home Chimes 1, no. 25 (21 June 1884): 343.

 

On Being Hard Up.  By an Idle Fellow.

Home Chimes 1, no. 40 (4 October 1884): 554 –55.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, London, Field & Tuer, 1886).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.  II.  On Being in the Blues.

Home Chimes 1, no. 43 (25 October 1884): 596-97.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   III. On Being in Love.

Home Chimes 1, no. 47 (22 November 1884): 654-55.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   IV.  On Babies.

Home Chimes 1, no. 50 (13 December 1884): 693-94.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Silly Billy.       

Era Almanack and Annual, 1885, 44-46.

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   V.  On Getting on in the World.

Home Chimes 2, no. 4 (24 January 1885): 81-83.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   VI.  On Being Idle.

Home Chimes 2, no. 5 (31 January 1885): 107-9.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   VII.  On Being Shy.

Home Chimes 2, no. 10 (7 March 1885): 218-20.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   VIII.  On “Furnished Apartments.”

Home Chimes 2, no. 12 (21 March 1885): 257-59.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.   IX.  On Eating and Drinking.

Home Chimes 2, no. 19 (9 May 1885): 416-18.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.    X.  On Vanity and Vanities.

Home Chimes 2, no. 24 (13 June 1885): 511-13.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.    XI.  On the Weather

Home Chimes 3, no. 2 (11 July 1885): 53-55.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.    XII.  On Memory.

Home Chimes 3, no. 13 (26 September 1885): 273-76.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Idle Thoughts.  By an Idle Fellow.    XIII.  On Dress and Deportment.

Home Chimes 3, no. 16 (17 October 1885): 348-52.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Chubby.

Home Chimes 3, no. 25 (19 December 1885): 529-32.

 

On Cats and Dogs.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no. 1 (February, 1886): 43-52.

(Collected in The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow).

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no. 1 (February, 1886): 75-80.

[Happy New Year; Tennyson’s Tiresias, and other Poems; Faust; Millais; politics].

 

On Reading and Writing.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no 2 (March 1886): 95-103.

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no.2 (March 1886): 155-60.

[Lord Beaconsfield’s Letters to his Sister; The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; American Copyright Bill; Valentine’s Day].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New series 1, no. 3 (April 1886): 235-40.

[Froude’s Oceana; emigration; Sarah Bernhardt; Metropolitan Police; skating].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no. 4 (May 1886): 315-20.

[South Kensington exhibitions; first nights at the play; William Edward Forster; Pinero’s The Schoolmistress; Easter].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no. 5 (June 1886): 396-400.

[the Academy Exhibition; the Grosvenor; plays; South Kensington Exhibition; Queen Victoria].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 1, no. 6 (July 1886): 471-76.

[Montmorency;  President Cleveland; tennis; plays; summer holidays].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 1 (August 1886): 75-80.

[Elections; Holloway College; hot weather].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 2 (September 1886): 157-60.

[Swimming; cricket; Belfast riots; river trip].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 3 (October 1886): 235-40.

[End of the world; readers’ correspondence; Covent Garden promenade concerts; Paris].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 4 (November 1886): 315-20.

[Coaching; Charles Hawtrey; London fogs; Richmond Hill; school fees].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 5 (December 1886): 395-400.

[Queen’s Jubilee; Statue of Liberty; Pinero].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 2, no. 6 (January 1887): 471-76.

[Christmas; The Good-natured Man].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 1 (February 1887): 75-80.

[New Year; children; Tennyson; serials].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 2 (March 1887): 155-60.

[Quiet; E. Nesbit; war]

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 3 (Apri1 1887): 235-40.

[Queen’s Jubilee; authors and publishers; Dr. Mackay; the Boat Race].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 4 (May 1887): 315-20.

[Sham fights; Charles Reade; plagiarism].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 5 (June 1887): 395-400.

[Weather; the Academy; cabs; Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 3, no. 6 (July 1887): 471-76.

[Summer evenings; suicide; Carlyle; theatre fires].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 1 (August 1887): 75-80.

[Milton’s cottage; Miss Cass case; August holidays].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 2 (September 1887): 155-60.

[Shooting season; Midland strike; Cass case; cockatoos].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 3 (October 1887): 235-40.

[North Wales].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 4 (November 1887): 315-20.

[Pirating; thieving instinct].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 5 (December 1887): 395-400.

[Trafalgar Square meetings; staying in bed; the circus].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 4, no. 6 (January 1888): 471-76.

[Special Constables].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 1 (February 1888): 75-80.

[Fog; colds; luck].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 2 (March 1888): 155-60.

[Country life; valentines; cost of living].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 3 (April 1888): 235-40.

[Kaiser’s death; prize-fighting; fires in theatres].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 4 (May 1888): 315-20.

[Daily Telegraph; daughters; Pinero’s Sweet Lavender; Little Lord Fauntleroy].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 5 (June 1888): 395-400.

[The “other half”; middlemen; warm weather; Little Lord Fauntleroy case].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 5, no. 6 (July 1888): 471-76.

[Cruelty to animals; telephones].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 1 (August 1888): 75-80.

[Gambling; journalistic focus on disasters; children].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 2 (September 1888): 155-60.

[Children; the weather; pirate buses].

 

Three Men in a Boat.

Home Chimes New series 6, September-December 1888.

Home Chimes New series 7, January-June 1889.

(Published Bristol, J. W. Arrowsmith, 1889)

.

 

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 3 (October 1888): 235-40.

[Marriage; smoking].

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 4 (November 1888): 315-20.

[English weather; holiday in Calais and Paris].

 

The Stage Hero.

Playgoer 1, no.1 (November 1888): 2-3.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants.  London, Chatto & Windus, 1889).

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 5 (December 1888): 395-400.

[Guy Fawkes Day; the Lord Mayor’s Show; journalism].

 

The Stage Villain

Playgoer 1, no. 2 (November 1888): 4 -5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

Gossips’ Corner.

Home Chimes New Series 6, no. 6 (January, 1889): 471-76.

[Theatrical books; School Board; New Year wishes; Henry Tate].

 

The Stage Lawyer.

Playgoer 1, no. 3 (January 1889): 4.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

The Stage Heroine.

Playgoer 1, no. 4 (February 1889): 4 -5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

The Stage Adventuress.

Playgoer 1, no. 5 (March 1889): 4 -5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

The Stage Comic Man.

Playgoer 1, no. 6 (April 1889): 4 -5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

The Stage Servant Girl.

Playgoer 1, no. 7 (May 1889): 4 -5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

Stage Peasantry.

Playgoer 1, no.8 (June 1889): 5.

(Collected in Stage-land: Curious Habits and Customs of its Inhabitants).

 

Wheat and Chaff.  [editorial notes]

Playgoer 2, no. 13 (2 November 1889): 9-10.

2, no. 14 (9 November 1889): 9-10.

2, no. 15 (16 November 1889): 9-10

2, no. 16 (23 November 1889): 9-10.

2, no. 17 (30 November 1889): 9-10.

 

The Oberammergau Passion Play.

Theatre, New Series 16, no. 1 (July 1890): 1-5.

 

Silhouettes.

Idler 1, no.1 (February 1892): 47-56.

(Collected in John Ingerfield, and Other Stories.  London, McClure,1893).

 

The Idler’s Club

Idler 1, no. 1 (February 1892): 106-18.

[informal round table discussion among several authors: in this first issue, Robert Barr, Barry Payn, Zangwill, Kennedy and Jerome; Jerome comments on Valentines and buying them, 113-8].

 

Variety Patter.

Idler 1, no. 2 (March 1892): 121-35.

(Collected in John Ingerfield, and Other Stories).

 

The Idler’s Club.

Idler 1, no. 2 (March 1892): 222-36.

[Jerome on music halls and the ballet, 222-5; and prosecuting cabmen, 236].

 

Novel Notes.

Idler 1, no. 4 (May 1892): 362-86 to 3, no. 3 (April 1893): 318-29.

(Published by The Leadenhall Press, August 1893).

 

The Idler’s Club.

Idler 1, no. 4 (May 1892): 474-84.

[Jerome on good men and oysters, virtues and vices, 480-81].

 

The Idler’s Club.

Idler 1, no. 5 (June 1892): 592-604.

[Jerome on the evil influence of automatic machines, 600-3].

 

Our House-Boat.              

Tauchnitz Magazine (July 1892): 41-53.

(Novel Notes, chapter IV).

 

The Idler’s Club.

Idler 2, no. 1 (August 1892): 99-112.

[Jerome on holidays, 99].

 

Our Heroine.      

Tauchnitz Magazine (August 1892): 16-28.

(Novel Notes, chapter III).

 

The Idler’s Club.

Idler 2, no. 3 (October 1892): 340-51.

[Jerome on a good bishop and a sinful reporter, pp. 340-43].

(Published, with alterations, as “The Lease of the ‘Cross Keys’,” in John Ingerfield, and Other Stories).

 

A Chat about Plots.        

Tauchnitz Magazine (October 1892): 8-23.

(Novel Notes, chapter V).

 

 

 

Cats.                     

Tauchnitz Magazine (November 1892): 18-33.

(Novel Notes, chapter VI).

 

Reformed Characters.   

Tauchnitz Magazine (December 1892): 50-60.

(Novel Notes, chapter VII).

 

A Discussion on Crime.    

Tauchnitz Magazine (January 1893): 27-4.

(Novel Notes, chapter VIII).

 

A Dual Character.           

Tauchnitz Magazine (February 1893) 21-35.

(Novel Notes, chapter IX).

 

About Soldiers.              

Tauchnitz Magazine (March 1893): 23-36.

(Novel Notes, chapter X).

 

The Seed of Sin and Virtue.           

Tauchnitz Magazine (April 1893): 12-27.

(Novel Notes, chapter XI).

 

The Last of the Great Work.             

Tauchnitz Magazine (May 1893): 19-29.

(Novel Notes, chapter XII).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Shall we Have a Dramatic Academy?” Idler 3, no. 5 (June 1893): 568-76.

[Jerome wishes to educate the playgoer, 575-76].

 

The Woman of the Sæter.

Idler 3, no. 6 (July 1893): 578-93.

(Collected in John Ingerfield, and Other Stories).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Nothing in Particular.” Idler 4, no. 1 (August 1893): 101-10.

[Jerome asks why “Cockney” is a term of reproach; discusses book reviewing practices, 107-9].

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Are Honeymoons a Success?” Idler 4, no. 2 (September 1893): 210-18.

[Jerome’s contribution, 216-18].

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Is it Pleasant to Give Presents?” Idler 4, no. 3 (October 1893): 318-28.

[Jerome’s contribution, 327-28].

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Fireworks of All Sorts.” Idler 4, no. 4 (November 1893): 430-38.

[Jerome’s contribution, 436-38].

 

To-Day Editorials, weekly from 11 November 1893 to 30 October 1897.

Each week Jerome wrote two or three pages, usually consisting of short paragraphs on a variety of topical issues.  These were followed by one or two columns of  “Answers to Enquirers.”  While many of his editorial paragraphs commented on current newspaper reports, certain themes tend to recur with frequency.  He was always indignant about cruelty to children or animals – especially the unfortunate horses that hauled London’s buses and other heavy traffic.  Attempts by local authorities to legislate on matters of morals – particularly teetotalism – regularly drew his scornful comments.  In his first few months, he assiduously promoted a race between Frank Shorland, the British 24 hour cycling champion and his French equivalent, and offered a substantial prize to the victor.  However, the National Cyclists’ Union would not sanction the race, even though both contestants were willing, because Shorland was an amateur and the French cyclist was a professional. (Nowhere in Jerome’s many contentious columns on the subject does he mention that Shorland was his nephew).

 

He deplored the violence of strikes, and at this date was in favour of conscription (a position he reversed during the First World War). He made scathing comments on the Jameson raid and Cecil Rhodes’ policies.  He applauded the Cretan fight for freedom from Turkish rule, and wrote so often and so strongly about Turkish atrocities against Armenians, that Sultan Abdul Hamid wrote to the Foreign Office demanding that he be required to desist and calling for an apology.  In October 1896 Jerome described with obvious enjoyment his interview with Lord Salisbury, and his response to these demands.

 

Characterscapes. I. The Man who Would Manage.

To-Day 1, no. 1 (11 November 1893): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green.  London, Longmans, Green & Co., 1897).

 

Characterscapes. II. The Man who Lived for Others.

To-Day 1, no. 2 (18 November 1893) 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Characterscapes. III. The Man of Habit.

To-Day 1, no. 3 (25 November 1893): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

My First Book.  “On the Stage and Off.”

Idler 4, no. 5 (December 1893): 439-56.

(Published in My First Book)

.

Characterscapes.  IV. The Absent-Minded Man.

To-Day 1, no. 4 (2 December 1893): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Characterscapes.  V.  A Charming Woman.

To-Day 1, no. 5 (9 December 1893): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Characterscapes.  VI.  Whibley’s Spirit.

To-Day 1, no. 6 (16 December 1893): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

That Telephone.  (unsigned).

To-Day 1, no. 7 (23 December 1893): 13-14

(Collected in The Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, in  “On the Delights and Benefits of Slavery.”  London, Hurst & Blackett, 1898).

 

How to Get a Play Accepted.  (from Playwriting, chapter IV).

To-Day 1, no. 7 (23 December 1893): 21.

 

Characterscapes.  VII.  The Man who Went Wrong.

To-Day 1, no. 7 (23 December 1893): 28-31.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Hints to Young Dramatists.  (from Playwriting, chapter VI).

To-Day 1, no.11 (20 January 1894): 21.

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Cabs and ‘Cabbies’.” Idler 5, no. 1 (February 1894): 110-12.

“Jerome Recalls a Ride in a Hansom Cab.” (short ghost story), 100-12].

 

Characterscapes.  VIII.  The Hobby Rider.

To-Day 2, no. 1 (10 February 1894): 1-3.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Policemen – of All Sorts.” Idler 5, no. 4 (May 1894): 435-48.

[Jerome describes his experience as a special constable, 447-48].

 

The Idler’s Club.

“The Same Story.” Idler 5, no. 5 (June 1894): 549-60.

[Jerome’s contribution: “Two Extracts from a Diary,” 558-60].

 

Echoes.

To-Day 4, no. 8 (29 September 1894): 225-27.

(Collected as Introduction to My First Book.  London, Chatto & Windus, 1894).

 

The Mystery of Black Rock Creek

Idler 6, no. 3 (October 1894): 302-26.

Chapter I (303-7) by Jerome; remaining chapters by Eden Phillpotts, E.F. Benson, F. Frankfort Moore, Barry Pain.

 

The Man Who Did Not Believe in Luck.

To-Day, 4, Winter number (November 1894): 44-47.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Should Christmas Be Abolished?” Idler 6, no. 5 (December 1894): 629-46.

[Jerome’s contribution, 641-46]

 

Tea-Table Talk.

To-Day 6, Spring number (April l895): 31-34.

 

The City of the Sea.

To-Day 7, Summer Number (August l895): 29-32.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Are Clever Women or Stupid the More Attractive to Men?” Idler 8, no. 1 (August 1895): 87-96.

[Jerome’s contribution, 87-88].

 

To the Readers of  “The Idler.”

Idler 8, no. 1 (August 1895): 97-100.

[Jerome’s plans, having gained sole control of  “The Idler.”]

 

Dick Dunkerman’s Cat

City Chimes; the Birmingham Magazine, Illustrated, December 1895.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Stories of the Town.  I – Blasé Billy.

Ladies Home Journal 13 no. 2 (January 1896): 10, 28.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Letters to Clorinda.

Idler 9, no. 1 (February 1896): 56-62.

9, no. 2 (March 1896): 284-88.

9, no. 3 (April 1896): 470-75.

9, no. 4 (May 1896): 610-14.

9, no. 5 (June 1896):760-63.

9, no. 6 (July 1896): 874-78.

10, no. 1 (August 1896):128-31.

10, no. 2 (September 1896): 270-73.

10, no. 3 (October 1896): 414-17.

10, no. 4 (November 1896): 554-57.

11, no. 1 (February 1897): 131-34.

11, no. 5 (June 1897): 684-87.

12, no. 2 (September 1897): 175-78.

(In 12, no. 2 (September 1897): 136, “Clorinda” is identified as Emmie Avery Keddell, who participates in the Idler’s Club discussions).

 

The Idler’s Club.

“Who is the Biggest Fool in the World?” Idler 9, no. 3 (April 1896): 478-82.

[Jerome’s contribution, 478-79]

 

Reginald Blake, Financier and Cad.

Idler 9, no. 5 (June 1896): 636-43.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

Reginald Blake, Financier and Cad.

Ladies Home Journal 13 no. 7 (June 1896): 2.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

The Choice of Cyril Harjohn

Idler 10, no. 1 (August 1896): 4-11.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

The Materialisation of Charles and Mivanway

Idler 10, no. 5 (December 1896): 573-80.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

An Item of Fashionable Intelligence.

Idler 10, no. 6 (January 1897): 722-33.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

An Item of Fashionable Intelligence.

Ladies Home Journal 14 no. 2 (January 1897): 11-12.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

A Fragment.

Idler 11, no. 2 (March 1897): 263-65.

 

Portrait of a Lady.

Idler 11, no. 3 (April 1897): 282-90.

(Collected in Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green).

 

A Woman’s Logic, from The Way to Win a Woman. A Comedy in Three Acts.

 Idler 12, no. 3 (October 1897): 415-18.

 

The Idler’s Club.

“What Would you Like Santa Claus to Bring you?” Idler 12, no. 5 (December 1897): 697-704.

[Jerome’s contribution, 697-98].

 

The Idler’s Club.

“What Good Resolutions do you Want your Friends to Make for the New Year?”

Idler 12, no. 6 (January 1898): 836-42.  [Jerome’s contribution, 836-37].

 

The Ghost of the Marchioness.

Munsey’s Magazine 18, no. 12 (March, 1898): 813-18.

(Collected as “The Ghost of the Marchioness of Appleford,” Chapter 1 of The Observations of Henry (Bristol, J.W. Arrowsmith, 1901); but American and Canadian editions simply title chapter 1 “The Observations of Henry.

 

Are Women Mean in Money Matters?  (Jerome is one of five contributors).     

Woman at Home, Annie S. Swan’s Magazine, no. 57 (June, 1898): 775-76.

 

The Surprise of Mr. Milberry: a Story

English Illustrated Magazine 20 (December, 1898): 209-16.    .

(Collected in The Observations of Henry).

 

Cinderella: a Reverie.

Woman at Home, Annie S. Swan’s Magazine, no. 58 (July, 1898): 858-61.

 

My Favorite Novelist and his Best Book.

Munsey’s Magazine 19, no. 1 (April 1898): 28-32.

 

The Uses and Abuses of Joseph.

Illustrated London News vol. 114 no. 3134 (13 May 1899): 679-81

(Collected in The Observations of Henry).

 

Three Men on the Bummel.

To-Day 25, no. 322 (4 January 1900): 705-9 to 26 no. 335 (5 April 1900): 297-301.

(Published by J. W. Arrowsmith, May 1900).

 

Three Men on Four Wheels.

Saturday Evening Post 172, no. 28 (6 January 1900): 577-79 to no. 41 (7 April 1900): 924-25.

(Published as Three Men on Wheels, Dodd, Mead, May 1900).

 

The Probation of James Wrench.

Sphere vol.1, no.20 (June 9, 1900): 637-39.

(Collected in The Observations of Henry).

 

The German Schoolboy.

Living Age 227 (8 December 1900): 648-52.

 

Paul Kelver. Illustrated by H. G. Evison.

To-Day 34, no. 432 (13 February 1902): 505-9 to 38, no. 484 (11 February 1903): 93-94.

(Published, without illustrations, by Hutchinson, September 1902).

 

The Bishop’s Double.

Household Words 1 (March-August 1902).

 

Tea Table Talk.

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 1 (June 1902): 43-48.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter I, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

Tea Table Talk.

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 2 (July 1902): 136-42.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter II, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

Summer Girls and Idle Fellows.

Saturday Evening Post 175, no. 1 (5 July 1902):  5-6.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter II, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1903).

 

Tea Table Talk.

Saturday Evening Post 175, no. 4 (26 July 1902):  5-6.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter III, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1903).

 

The Marriage Question.

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 3 (August 1902): 305-11.

(Collected in Tea Table Talk, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

Tea Table Talk.

Saturday Evening Post 175, no. 9 (30 August 1902): 3-4.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter IV, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1903).

 

What Becomes of it?

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 4 (September 1902): 385-90.

(Collected in Tea Table Talk, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

Tea Table Talk.

Saturday Evening Post 175, no. 12 (20 September 1902): 8-9.

(Tea Table Talk, chapter V, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1903).

 

What is Woman Made of?

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 4 (October 1902): 537-43.

(Collected in Tea Table Talk, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

The End of it All.

Windsor Magazine 16, no. 5 (November 1902): 618-23.

(Collected in Tea Table Talk, London, Hutchinson, 1903).

 

The Temptation of Miss Ramsbotham.  The Love Story of an Unmanageable Woman.

Saturday Evening Post 175, no. 21 (22 November 1902): 1-2, 19-20, 22.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter IV, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

The Temptation of Miss Ramsbotham.

Cassell’s Magazine, Christmas 1902 (26 November 1902):54-62.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter IV, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

The Books of my Childhood.  – III. Letters from Ten Well-Known People. (Jerome contributes eight lines, recalling Hans Andersen and one other author).

      T. P.’s Weekly, vol. 1 no. 3 (28 November 1902): 85.

 

The Stolen Interview.  “Tommy” Shows Aptitude for Journalism.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 22 (28 November 1903): 1-4.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter I, New York, Dodd., Mead, 1904).

 

“Tommy” Shows Aptitude for Journalism.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 1 (December 1903): 38-50.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter I, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

The Beginnings of William Clodd.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 26 (26 December 1903): 2-5, 19.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter II, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

The Beginnings of William Clodd.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 2 (January 1904): 277-86.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter II, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

Is the British Drama Worth Keeping Alive?

New Liberal Review 6, no. 36 (January 1904): 698-710.

 

Education of the Grindleys.  A Course not Listed in the University Catalogue.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 30 (23 January 1904): 5-7, 30-32.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter III, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

The Education of the Grindleys.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 3 (February 1904): 345-56.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter III, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

Miss Loveredge Receives.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 35 (27 February 1904): 3-5, 30-32.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter V, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

Miss Loveredge Receives.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 4 (March 1904): 492-504.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter V, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

Good Humor Obtains the Marble Soap Advertisement.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 40 (2 April 1904): 3-5, 22-24.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter VI, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

“Good Humour” Obtains the Marble Soap Advertisement.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 5 (April 1904): 651-66.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter VI, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

Dick Danvers Comes to Life.

Saturday Evening Post 176, no. 47 (21 May 1904): 9-11, 30-31.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter VII, New York, Dodd, Mead, 1904).

 

Dick Danvers Comes to Life.

Windsor Magazine 19, no. 6 (May 1904): 709-22.

(Collected in Tommy and Co., chapter VII, London, Hutchinson, 1904).

 

The Passing of the Third Floor Back.

Saturday Evening Post 177, no. 21 (19 November 1904): 9-11, 39.

(Collected in The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories, London, Hurst & Blackett, 1907)

 

The Problem of the Problem Play.

Harper’s Weekly 48 (10 December 1904): 56-58.

(Collected in The Angel and the Author – and Others, chapter VIII, London, Hurst & Blackett, 1908).

 

Interview with Jerome K. Jerome.  A Talk on the Young Man’s Journal.

To-Day 45, no. 586 (25 January 1905): 369-70.

 

Idle Thoughts.

To-Day 46, no. 587 (1 February 1905): 3-4 to no. 598 (19 April 1905): 367-70.

(Collected in The Angel and the Author – and Others, chapters I-II, V, VII, IX, XI, XIII, XV-XX).

 

Answers to Correspondents.

To-Day 46, no. 587 (1 February 1905):19-20 to no. 588 (8 February 1905): 55-56.

 

My Best Story and Why I Think so.  No. 8.  Portrait of a Lady, by Jerome K. Jerome.

Grand Magazine 2, no. 8 (September 1905): 177-84.

 

The Soul of Nicholas Snyders        

Windsor Magazine 22 (1905): 337-46.

(Collected in The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)

 

The Philosopher’s Joke.    

Critic 47 (December 1905): 533-38, 548 (January 1906,): 68-72.

(Collected in The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)

 

Why Do we Read?          

Woman’s Home Companion 33 (January 1906) 20.

 

The Cost of Kindness.       

Strand Magazine 31 (1906): 91-96.

(Collected in The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)

 

You Can’t be Funny All the Time.

Cosmopolitan 41 (May 1906): 110-12.

 

Are we Funnier than our Grandfathers?

Strand Magazine 32 (December 1906): 741-42.

 

The Week-End Cottage. An Episode.

Story-Teller. A Magazine of Clever Fiction (May 1909): 185-89.

(Collected in They and I, Chapter III, London, Hutchinson, 1909).

 

The Week-End Cottage. An Episode.

Good Housekeeping 49 (August 1909): 128-31.

(Collected in They and I, Chapter III).

 

How I Spend Christmas. (thirteen contributors, Jerome entry is three lines)

Bookman vol. 37, no. 319 (December 1909): 135.

 

Charles Dickens.  The Fellowship of Love.

Youth’s Companion 86, no. 1 (4 January 1912): 3.

 

Jerome K. Jerome Thinks he Once Met Dickens.

Bookman 16 (February, 1912): 252.

(in collection of authors’ reminiscences of Dickens, pp. 246-55).

 

What Shall we Get Out of it?

John Bull (12 December 1914): 18.

 

 

What are we Fighting for?

War and Peace 2, no. 19 (April 1915): 103-6.

(Invited responses from prominent politicians and writers; Jerome comment 106)

 

Sylvia of the Letters.

McBride’s Magazine 96 no. 574 (October 1915): 70-87.

(Collected in Malvina of Brittany, London, Cassell, 1916, and The Street of the Blank Wall, NewYork, Dodd, Mead, 1916).

 

The Curse of the Press.

New Days (16 Oct 1915): 117-18.

 

His Evening Out.

Century  91 (November 1915): 37-51.

(Collected in Malvina of Brittany and The Street of the Blank Wall).

 

Martyred Birds.

Current History 2 no. 2 (November 1915): 371.

 

God Punish Germany!

New Days (4 Dec 1915}: 299-300.

 

Let us Cut our Losses and Make a Fresh Start.

Ford Times (Christmas 1917): 132-34.

 

Obstacles to Peace.  Interview with Mr. Jerome K. Jerome.

Common Sense 4, no. 9 (2 March, 1918): 114.

 

The Night Call.

Reveille no. 1 (August 1918): 98-102.

 

Mr. Jerome K. Jerome on Peace Dangers.

Common Sense 5, no. 23 (7 December 1918): 244.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 19 (10 May 1919): 285-86.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 20 (17 May 1919): 301-2.

 

Idle Thoughts.  The Phraseology of the Phrasemongers.

Common Sense 6, no. 21 (24 May 1919): 317-18.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 22 (31 May 1919): 333-34.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 23 (7 June 1919): 349-50.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 24 (14 June 1919): 365-66.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 6, no. 25 (21 June 1919): 381-82.

 

 

Idle Thoughts.  Concerning Spooks.

Common Sense 6, no. 26 (28 June 1919): 397-98.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 7. no. 1 (5 July 1919): 1-2.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 7, no. 2 (12 July 1919): 19.

 

Idle Thoughts.  Hanging the Kaiser.

Common Sense 7, no. 3 (19 July 1919): 33-34.

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 7, no. 4 (26 July 1919): 49-50.

 

Idle Thoughts.  Spirits and Spiritualism.  A Reply to Sir A. Conan Doyle.

Common Sense 7, no. 5 (2 August 1919): 65-66.

 

Idle Thoughts – Youth and Age.

Common Sense 7, no. 6 (9 August 1919): 83.

 

Idle Thoughts.  On How to Treat “the Lower Orders.”

Common Sense, vol. 7, no. 7 (16 August 1919): 99.

 

Idle Thoughts – Houses and Miracles.

Common Sense, vol. 7, no. 8 (23 August 1919): 115.

 

Psychology of Atmosphere

Nation 109  no. 2825 (23 August 1919): 265-6.

(Reprints part of Common Sense article of 12 July 1919).

 

Idle Thoughts.

Common Sense 7, no. 9 (30 August 1919): 131.

 

Idle Thoughts.  “German Atrocities.  Second Edition.”

Common Sense 7, no. 10 (6 September 1919): 146.

 

Idle Thoughts on the Lower Orders.

Common Sense 7, no. 11 (13 September 1919): 165.

 

Idle Thoughts. – The Patriotic Protectionist.

Common Sense 7, no. 12 (20 September 1919): 181.

 

Jerome K. Jerome in Reply to Conan Doyle.

(Reprint of part of Common Sense article of 2 August 1919, quoted by New York Tribune).

Literary Digest 62 no. 12 (20 September 1919): 25.

 

Idle Thoughts on Lying.

Common Sense 7, no. 13 (27 September 1919): 189-90.

 

Idle Thoughts.  The Gospel of the Jungle.

Common Sense 7, no. 14 (4 October 1919): 205-6.

 

Idle Thoughts on Government by Advertisement.

Common Sense 7, no. 15 (11 October 1919): 217-18.

 

Idle Thoughts on the Devil.

Common Sense 7, no. 17 (25 October 1919): 251.

 

Idle Thoughts on Nationalisation and Bureaucracy.

Common Sense 7, no. 18 (1 November 1919): 267.

 

Idle Thoughts.  After Dinner.

Common Sense 7, no. 19 (8 November 1919): 281-82.

 

Idle Thoughts – Tommy Atkins and Others.

Common Sense 7, no. 20 (15 November 1919): 293.

 

Idle Thoughts – on One Another’s Burdens.      

Common Sense 7, no. 21 (22 November 1919): 316.

 

Idle Thoughts.  Too Much Sentiment.

Common Sense 7, no. 22 (29 November 1919): 329-30.

 

Novels I Have Never Written.

Common Sense 7, no. 23 (6 December 1919): 354.

 

Idle Thoughts.  Misanthropy.

Common Sense 7, no. 24 (13 December 1919): 365-66.

 

Idle Thoughts on Village Life & Village Concerts.

Common Sense 7, no. 25 (20 December 1919): 382.

.

A New Year Thought. – Let us Make Peace.

Common Sense 8, no. 1 (3 January 1920): 3.

 

Women and Birds.

Common Sense 8, no. 2 (10 January 1920): 18.

 

Revolution: the Old Order Changeth.

Common Sense 8, no. 3 (17 January 1920): 35.

 

The League of Nations.

Common Sense 8, no. 4 (24 January 1920): 50.

 

The Golden Age.

Common Sense 8, no. 5 (31 January 1920): 65-66.

 

Idle Thoughts on Ancient and Modern Dress.

Common Sense 8, no. 6 (7 February 1920): 81-82.

 

Idle Thoughts on War Criminals.

Common Sense 8, no. 7 (14 February 1920): 102.

 

Idle Thoughts on Bolshevism and Boloism.

Common Sense 8, no. 8 (21 February 1920): 114.

 

Idle Thoughts on Europe.

Common Sense 8, no. 9 (28 February 1920): 131.

 

Idle Thoughts on Nationalisation.

Common Sense 8, no. 10 (6 March 1920): 146.

 

Idle Thoughts on Bolsheviks.

Common Sense 8, no. 11 (13 March 1920): 158.

 

The Fighting Instinct.

Common Sense 8, no. 12 (20 March 1920): 170.

 

Some Spring Books. Critics v. Public.

Common Sense 8, no. 13 (27 March 1920): 187.

 

Idle Thoughts on Worry.

Common Sense 8, no. 15 (10 April 1920): 209-10.

 

A Newspaper for Labour, Politics and Jam.

Common Sense 8, no. 16 (17 April 1920): 221-22.

 

Is the Labour Party Fit to Govern?

Common Sense 8, no. 17 (24 April 1920): 235.

 

Burn your School-Books.

Common Sense 8, no. 20 (15 May 1920): 271.

 

Idle Thoughts on Ireland.

Common Sense 8, no. 21 (22 May 1920): 282.

 

Idle Thoughts on Civilisation.

Common Sense 8, no. 22 (29 May 1920): 294.

 

Idle Thoughts on Youth.     

Common Sense 8, no. 23 (5 June 1920): 311.

 

Idle Thoughts on Goths.

Common Sense 8, no. 24 (12 June 1920): 322.

 

Idle Thoughts on an Ill-Mannered Question.

Common Sense 8, no. 26 (26 June 1920): 345-46.

 

If I Were King.

Common Sense 9, no. 2 (10 July 1920): 18.

 

Government of the People, by the People, and for the People.                         

Common Sense 9, no. 5 (31 July 1920): 50.

 

Christ and Caesar.

Common Sense 9, no. 7 (14 August 1920): 78.

 

I Told you so.

Common Sense 9, no. 9 (28 August 1920) 112.

 

The Fall of Man.

Common Sense 9, no. 11 (11 September 1920): 137-38.

 

Man’s Dream – A Sheffield Millennium.

Common Sense 9, no. 13 (25 September 1920): 170.

 

 

What the Public Wants.

Common Sense 9, no. 15 (9 October 1920): 209.

 

Mr. Wells’ World.

Common Sense 9, no. 17 (23 October 1920): 233-34.

 

In Despairing Mood.

Common Sense 9, no. 19 (6 November 1920): 266.

 

The Sham League.

Common Sense 9, no. 21 (20 November 1920): 298.

 

Idle Thoughts on Films.      

Common Sense 10, no. 23 (4 December 1920): 16.

 

Christianity at Christmas.

Common Sense 10, no. 26 (25 December 1920): 82-83.

 

The Roman Holiday Modern Style.

Common Sense, (undated – proof of unpublished article?)

 

War, and the Common People.

Foreign Affairs 2, no. 8 (February 1921): 117-18.

 

Lest we Perish.    

Record of the Save the Children Fund (1 February 1921).

 

Confessions of a Humorist.  I.- Literary Beginnings.

Strand Magazine 69, no. 5 (May 1925): 492-500.

Collected in My Life and Times, Chapter IV, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1926.

 

Confessions of a Humorist. II.

Strand Magazine 69, no. 6 (June 1925): 569-78.

Collected in My Life and Times, Chapter VI.

 

Confessions of a Humorist. III. – Trials of a Dramatist.

Strand Magazine 70, no. 1 (July 1925) 88-96.

Collected in My Life and Times, Chapter VII.

 

Confessions of a Humorist. IV. – American Reminiscences.

 Strand Magazine 70, no. 2 (August 1925): 135-42.

Collected in My Life and Times, Chapter XI.

 

Confessions of a Humorist. V. – Editorial Reminiscences.

Strand Magazine 70, no. 3 (September 1925): 296-304.

Collected in My Life and Times, Chapter VIII.

 

Chronicles of a Playwright.

Harper’s Magazine 151 no. 1 (June 1925): 67-75.

(Expanded in My Life and Times, chapter VII, “Trials of a Dramatist.”)

 

When I Was an Editor.

Harper’s Magazine 151 no. 2 (July 1925): 189-98.

(Expanded in My Life and Times, chapter VIII, “I Become an Editor.”)

 

 

For this Purpose.  A Little Sermon on our Service to God.  By the Man who Wrote “The Passing of the Third Floor Back.”

Good Housekeeping  82 (May 1926): 81, 186, 189-90, 193-4.

 

A Week-End Cottage.

Argosy 1, no. 1 (June 1926): 85-88.

(This version is more complete than the 1909 Storyteller article)

Collected in They and I, Chapter III).

 

In Remembrance of John Ingerfield and of Anne, his Wife.  A Tale of Old London.

Argosy 1, no. 2 (July 1926):101-12.

(From John Ingerfield, London, McClure, 1894).

 

The House he Wanted.

T.P.’s and Cassell’s Weekly (24 July 1926): 429-30.

(Reprinted in Idle Thoughts no. 8, December 1989, pp. 15-20).

 

The Soul of Nicholas Snyders.

Argosy 1, no. 3 (August 1926): 27-34.

(From The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)

 

The Passing of the Third Floor Back.

Argosy 1, no. 7 (December 1926): 97-106.

(From The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)

 

The Best Time of Life.    

T.P.’s and Cassell’s Weekly (5  February 1927): 495-96.;

(Reprinted in Idle Thoughts no. 7, May 1989, pp.  15-17).

 

The Love of Ulrich Nebendahl.

Argosy 1, no. 11 (April 1927): 29-32.

(From The Passing of the Third Floor Back, and Other Stories)